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Private landlords shrug off regulatory and tax onslaughts

Latest sentiment survey from Your Move reveals only 16% are negative about the market.

Nigel Lewis

Recent reports of unhappy landlords exiting the market in droves may have been exaggerated according to a survey of 1,100 landlords by estate agency chain Your Move.

Only 16% responded negatively when asked about their attitude towards current market conditions, while 30% were indifferent and 52% positive.

Landlords are a hardy lot, the company’s research suggests. The positive results of the survey come despite increasing levels of landlord licensing, looming additional regulation, shrinking tax allowances, additional Stamp Duty for second homes and stricter lending rules being applied to portfolio operators.

Your Move says landlords care more about the cost of maintaining their property and whether it’s going to make a long term profit much more than the tenant fees ban or Brexit.

And two thirds of those canvassed said they were going to tread water over the next 12 months and were unlikely to sell any further properties.

“Our research shows the majority of landlords are in it for the long term and that’s important for the well-being of the Private Rental Sector, providing much needed homes for those who cannot yet afford or do not wish to purchase due to lifestyle choices,” says Martyn Alderton, National Lettings Director at Your Move and Reeds Rains (left).

“Given the number of regulatory and tax changes in the Buy to Let market over the last few years, it wouldn’t be surprising if landlords felt some trepidation about the future.

“It’s great to see that the landlords we surveyed do, for the most part, remain positive about the future.”

 

August 15, 2018

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