Association of Independent Inventory Clerks

  • Latest property newsevans
    Latest property news

    Meet the new ‘Mr Inventories’ as AIIC appoints new chair

    Daniel Evans says he's perfectly placed to help inventory clerks navigate the 'troubled waters' facing the sector.

    Read More »
  • Latest property news
    Latest property news

    Letting agents using clandestine inventory companies to sidestep fees ban, says trade body

    AIIC says tenants are already being offered inventories by 'independent' inventory that in reality are owned by the agent involved.

    Read More »
  • Latest property news
    Latest property news

    Make inventory reports compulsory and regulated, says trade body

    The trade body representing inventory report professionals in the UK has called for their work to be made both compulsory and regulated during the lettings process. Danny Zane (pictured, below), the joint chair of the Association of Independent Inventory Clerks (AICC), also says that if the letting fees ban reduces the number of inventories used within the private rented sector as landlords seek to cut costs, it will render the protected deposits protection system “pointless”. “With the election over and a new housing minister now in place, it’s time for the government to think about housing and in particular the growing private rented sector, which now accounts for around a fifth of all households,” he says. “Independent, third party inventories are a fundamentally important part of the lettings process and they need to be made obligatory. “In the past, politicians have been quick to praise the success of compulsory deposit protection – introduced in 2007. Unbiased inventory “But if there is no unbiased inventory detailing the condition of the property at the beginning and end of the tenancy, then all this good work is undermined and it could be argued that taking deposits and protecting them is essentially rendered pointless.”…

    Read More »
  • Latest property newstenant fees
    Latest property news

    Tenant fees ban will have an unintended consequence, Mr Hammond

    Two senior figures within the lettings industry have said that the tenant fees ban announced by Philip Hammond in his Autumn statement is likely to make life more difficult for tenants, not easier. Martin Totty, CEO of HomeLet (pictured, left) and David Cox, MD of ARLA (pictured below), both told The Negotiator that they expect tenants to be asked for – and pay the costs of – providing their own references if a full ban is implemented. Totty, who heads up the UK’s largest referencing agency, says that while there is now uncertainty about what might happen to referencing after agents and landlords are prevented from passing on their cost to tenants, if this does happen renters should not “assume referencing is no longer their liability” if they want to secure a property. “This would be an unfortunate [and] unintended consequence of the announcement contained in the Autumn Statement,” he says. David Cox agrees, saying that if referencing agencies such as HomeLet are forced to find alternative business models, these companies will turn to tenants to pay the cost of checking their financial and rental track records. Cox says that if a full ban is introduced he believes agents will ask tenants for…

    Read More »
  • Latest property newsinventory check image
    Regulation & Law

    Tenants should attend inventory check-out

    All agents will agree that it is good practice to have a detailed and accurate inventory completed at the start of the tenancy, and again when the tenancy ends, but tenants should be encouraged to attend the check-out in order to avoid potential disputes between both sides of the rental transaction, according to the Association of Independent Inventory Clerks (AIIC). Tenancy deposits are often necessary to protect the landlord in the event of non-payment of rent or loss resulting from the tenant not complying with the terms of the tenancy agreement. Combined with a well prepared inventory, the landlord enjoys a much more risk-free tenancy. But end of tenancy disputes can often arise when the tenant disagrees with the recorded state of the rental property at the end of a tenancy in comparison to its condition when they first arrived, and find that they face having money deducted from their deposit as a consequence. The AIIC believes that the number of potential disagreements between landlords and tenants could be significant reduced if more tenants were present at the inventory check-out. The AIIC’s plea comes in response to data released by the Deposit Protection Service in July, which suggested that almost…

    Read More »
Back to top button