How local council majority impacts average house prices

Research from national UK estate agent, Keller Williams UK, has found that Conservative-led regions are the worst performing when it comes to falling average house prices

average house prices politics

Despite losing one seat overall in the last general election, Lib Dem majority council areas have the highest average house price according to research from national estate agent, Keller Williams UK.

Analysis of house prices in all of the 124 districts, unitary and borough councils of England revealed that there’s been a 13.2 per cent increase across Liberal Democrat ruled constituencies since the 2019 general election while Tory-led regions have seen a 1.7 per cent drop.

The average house prices across Lib Dem and Conservative majority areas are £430,141 and £283,512 respectively. Labour-held areas have the lowest average house price at just £193,487, but this still marks an average rise of 8.3% since 2019.

In this same period of time, the average house price for the whole of England has gone up by 9.5%.

Though anecdotal, the findings suggest that the nation’s wealthiest homeowners are feeling increasingly aligned with the Liberal Democrat message and starting to push back against the muscle memory which has, for years, seen them stand in the polling station and draw a cross in the Conservative box.

Political partyAverage house price during previous election (2019)Average house price across 2021 election councilsChange £Change %
Liberal Democrats£379,999£430,141£50,14213.2%
Labour£178,678£193,487£14,8098.3%
NOC (No Overall Control)£253,019£266,304£13,2855.3%
Conservative£288,555£283,512-£5,043-1.7%
England£244,928£268,291£23,3639.5%

 

CEO of Keller Williams UK, Ben Taylor, commented, “This data is quite remarkable simply because it rubs against the broad preconception that the Conservative Party are the party of choice for the rich and wealthy. We already knew that the 2019 general election saw them steal come unexpected regions from Labour, such as the felling of the so-called ed Wall, but it was still assumed that the nation’s most wealthy areas were Tory strongholds.

“We’d never seek to engage in political commentary as such, but it seems the Lib Dems have become the wealthy homeowner’s party of choice which I would say gives an illuminating insight into the current political landscape. For Boris and many old-school Conservatives, the traditional demographic that they have always tried to appeal to is changing, which means the way they present themselves and the values they fight for might also have to change.”


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