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Twitter campaign to end ‘no fault’ evictions and expose bad landlords and agents goes viral

#VentYourRent hashtag on Twitter garners strong response from renters and campaigners and is likely to feature on ITV tomorrow.

Nigel Lewis

A twitter campaign to end Section 21 ‘no fault’ evictions has gone viral with nearly 250 people tweeting and re-tweeting 540 posts about their experiences of renting or being evicted for no reason.

The campaign has also been noticed by ITV, who have been asking renters to contact them with details of their poor renting experiences, so expect lots of coverage about the campaign this evening or tomorrow.

Started by lobbying group Generation Rent last week, it suddenly went viral today on the hashtag #VentYourRent as a deluge of pictures and stories spread across Twitter.

The campaign has some heavyweight supporters including the Salvation Army, Crisis, The Times newspaper, The Labour Party and the London Assembly and think tanks Civitas and the Resolution Foundation.

Generation Rent says Section 21 evictions are the leading cause of homelessness in the UK.

“In England and Wales, the combination of reliance on short fixed-term tenancies and rising rents has made more people homeless through tenancies ending,” a spokesperson from Crisis says.

“So, while private rented tenancies often provide homeless people with settled accommodation for a period of time, they can also be the cause of repeat homelessness.”

The #VentYourRent stream consists mainly of tenants complaining in photos via messages written on bits of cardboard about both landlords and letting agents.

This includes stories of unfairly deducted deposits, landlords and agents who access properties without notifying tenants first and poorly maintained rented homes, including some pretty dire damp pictures.

“A good relationships between a tenant and their landlord or agent is essential to help this kind of thing happening,” says Sheraz Dar, CEO of rent recognition platform CreditLadder.

“We’ve never understood why a landlord would not want to take care of the property they rent out – it’s not in anyone’s interest to leave things broken or in a dangerous condition.”

Research by Generation Rent reveals that Section 21 evictions have tripled to 3,000 a year over the past nine years.

Read more about Section 21 notices.

August 20, 2018

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